Welcome to Bordertown: a magical audiobook sweepstakes!

ellenkushner:

One lucky winner at the Tor.com Bordertown Sweepstakes will receive a copy of the new special edition Welcome to Bordertown audiobook, along with contraband from Bordertown (a ticket for the Ye Olde Unicorn Trolley and a flyer for B-town band Eldritch Steel at The Dancing Ferret) and three bonus CDs from musicians featured in the audiobook, including “The Well Below” from Boiled in Lead, “Nykken and Bear” from Kari Tauring, and “Toybox” from Felonious Bosch. (Tiny sword in the photo not included—but Stubby the Rocket buttons are!)

It’s everything you need to throw your own magical Bordertown dance party, so comment in the Tor.com Bordertown Sweepstakes post to enter!  Contest ends at noon ET on Friday, Sept. 20th.

image

Some of the ear candy you’ll hear on the new CD: 

* Neil Gaiman reading his poem “The Song of the Song”

* Ellen Kushner reading all other poems (including a rap by Jane Yolen!) with a musical score by Drew Miller (with singer Kari Tauring and violinist David Stenshoe)

Steven Brust singing lead vocals on a fully-produced track for this “Run Back Across the Border,” backed by Drew Miller and Felonious Bosch,

* Amal El-Mohtar’s own setting of her poem “Stairs in Her Hair,” sung by her sister Dounya! The poem was written to accompany Catherynne M. Valente’s story in the book, which is brilliantly read by Cassandra Campbell!

Welcome to Bordertown, edited by Holly Black & Ellen Kushner, is the latest in the long-running urban fantasy series created by Terri Windling.  This anthology features stories by all of them, plus Cory Doctorow, Nalo Hopkinson, Cassandra Clare Alaya Dawn Johnson, Emma Bull, Charles de Lint and others.

waywardsnow:

welcome to Bordertown, losers <3



See?

waywardsnow:

welcome to Bordertown, losers <3

See?

(via spoopy-booty-deactivated2014052)

traders' heaven : my geek: let me show you it

Just what the well-dressed human needs for that Back-to-School special look!

(via spoopy-booty-deactivated2014052)

good luck…

harriet-myres:

Apparently, it’s the right time in my life to be welcomed in strange towns where the impossible is totally normal…


Night Vale

Bordertown

They’re two places you all should definitely experience! <3

Welcome to Bordertown! Really.

(via harriet-myres-deactivated201310)

21 notes

How to Get to Bordertown from the Human Realm

littlefirerabbit:

image

"All right, here’s the deal. You want a map, a timetable, and clear directions to get to Bordertown. We’re going to give you a history lesson first. Shut up, pay attention."

Read More

(Source: thisisstellarrabbit)

btownwherehouse:

So.. bumped into this band calling themselves Tiosal, down in SoHo the other night.  Managed to snag one of the last copies of their last album they recorded before they “disappeared.&#8221;  Turns out they got here to town about the same time I did - they showed up in ‘98.. They described their music as “Gypsy Rock..&#8221; S’pose that fits with Btown pretty much perfectly.  I liked their stuff and struck up a conversation with them.  Turns out they’re originally from the same part of the world I was;  the midwest Wisconsin/Illinois heartland.  Glad they made it across. I was amused by the cover art though, I mean, it’s none too subtle what they were planning to do, right? Still, like my family, nobody thought they’d do it. I swear, self-denial and self-delusion are the most powerful of human magicks, stronger even than the best SoHo Magicians, Wizards and Elf-Mages can conjure. Even when confronted with the blunt, obvious truth in front of their faces, too many people are still blind. Ahh well. Too bad they (Tiosal) probably won’t have any future albums released though, unless someone figures out how to master and cut albums here in Btown.  There will probably be a track or two on Saturday’s Wherehouse Radio though. -DM

btownwherehouse:

So.. bumped into this band calling themselves Tiosal, down in SoHo the other night.  Managed to snag one of the last copies of their last album they recorded before they “disappeared.”  Turns out they got here to town about the same time I did - they showed up in ‘98.. They described their music as “Gypsy Rock..” S’pose that fits with Btown pretty much perfectly.  I liked their stuff and struck up a conversation with them.  Turns out they’re originally from the same part of the world I was;  the midwest Wisconsin/Illinois heartland.  Glad they made it across. I was amused by the cover art though, I mean, it’s none too subtle what they were planning to do, right? Still, like my family, nobody thought they’d do it. I swear, self-denial and self-delusion are the most powerful of human magicks, stronger even than the best SoHo Magicians, Wizards and Elf-Mages can conjure. Even when confronted with the blunt, obvious truth in front of their faces, too many people are still blind. Ahh well. Too bad they (Tiosal) probably won’t have any future albums released though, unless someone figures out how to master and cut albums here in Btown.  There will probably be a track or two on Saturday’s Wherehouse Radio though. -DM

ellenkushner:

So guess what we listened to yesterday on our roadtrip down to Hollins U.?
Living in NYC without a car (or even a regular subway commute, I don’t have a lot of chance to listen to audiobooks. And I find listening to my own stuff can be kind of embarrassing.  But this one was an Audie Nominee - and when I met the delightful co-narrator Cassandra Campbell at the Audie Awards in May (we lost, but took plenty of adorable pictures together!), I was eager to hear the magic that she &amp; MacLeod Andrews managed to make.  She told me they’d had tremendous fun with the book - she narrated all the women’s POV stories, he did the men’s, and they took turns directing each other!
So we popped in CD #1.  WELCOME TO BORDERTOWN!  First, I heard Holly Black read her own intro … . then had to sit through Me reading both Terri Windling’s intro (yay!) and my own (torture!!) and then, oh then, MacLeod started on the Diggers’ House Rules - and it was Pure Bliss.  We got about 2/3 into “Welcome to Bordertown,” the story I wrote with Terri - and I was enchanted.  Not only does he bring Terri’s Jimmy (aka “Mr Fixit”) to life - but he made me forget I wrote my bit - I got so involved in the story, I actually laughed aloud (and not in self-congratulation!).
Can’t wait for the next drive, so I can find out what happens next - and hear him and Cassandra work their magic on all the other stories.
If you need something for your next road trip, please consider ordering this one from Audible.com - if you’re not already a member, you can do a trial membership for 30 days, and if you pick any of my books  throughout June (June being “Audio Book Month!”), I get Extra Credit from Audible! 
Thanks - and happy trails!  May your road be full of stories.

ellenkushner:

So guess what we listened to yesterday on our roadtrip down to Hollins U.?

Living in NYC without a car (or even a regular subway commute, I don’t have a lot of chance to listen to audiobooks. And I find listening to my own stuff can be kind of embarrassing.  But this one was an Audie Nominee - and when I met the delightful co-narrator Cassandra Campbell at the Audie Awards in May (we lost, but took plenty of adorable pictures together!), I was eager to hear the magic that she & MacLeod Andrews managed to make.  She told me they’d had tremendous fun with the book - she narrated all the women’s POV stories, he did the men’s, and they took turns directing each other!

So we popped in CD #1.  WELCOME TO BORDERTOWN!  First, I heard Holly Black read her own intro … . then had to sit through Me reading both Terri Windling’s intro (yay!) and my own (torture!!) and then, oh then, MacLeod started on the Diggers’ House Rules - and it was Pure Bliss.  We got about 2/3 into “Welcome to Bordertown,” the story I wrote with Terri - and I was enchanted.  Not only does he bring Terri’s Jimmy (aka “Mr Fixit”) to life - but he made me forget I wrote my bit - I got so involved in the story, I actually laughed aloud (and not in self-congratulation!).

Can’t wait for the next drive, so I can find out what happens next - and hear him and Cassandra work their magic on all the other stories.

If you need something for your next road trip, please consider ordering this one from Audible.com - if you’re not already a member, you can do a trial membership for 30 days, and if you pick any of my books  throughout June (June being “Audio Book Month!”), I get Extra Credit from Audible! 

Thanks - and happy trails!  May your road be full of stories.

41 notes

tofixtheshadows:

      &gt;For the halfies and Truebloods of Bordertown.

The lives of elves are long.They are easily bored.They eat dreams for breakfast, Are empty again by lunch.




Read the whole poem by Delia Sherman here (thank you, Cabinet des Fées!)

tofixtheshadows:

      >For the halfies and Truebloods of Bordertown.

The lives of elves are long.
They are easily bored.
They eat dreams for breakfast, 
Are empty again by lunch.

Read the whole poem by Delia Sherman here (thank you, Cabinet des Fées!)

sunrire:

0rient-express:
Life (by Steven Chan)




Train travel to the border seems to be picking up some. Maybe it&#8217;s Catherynne Valente&#8217;s fault.

sunrire:

0rient-express:

Life (by Steven Chan)

Train travel to the border seems to be picking up some. Maybe it’s Catherynne Valente’s fault.

(via beautiful-portals)

QUESTION: How do all of the Bordertown authors go about writing interconnected stories? Is there a big story that connects them all, or is it more that each individual story takes place in the same setting of Bordertown and the same characters appear throughout each?

When you edit an anthology, is it difficult to determine the order the stories will go in?

ANSWER: There’s a lot of communication that goes on between all the Bordertown writers as they’re working on their stories, and then a certain amount of “weaving” of the stories that happens in the editorial process. It’s complicated, but it works. (And it’s a whole lot easier now than it was in the pre-Internet 1980s!)

Ordering stories for an anthology is like ordering pieces of music on a playlist. You have to get the right flow….

sarahalyse:

sarahalyse:

From “The Sages of Elsewhere” by Will Shetterly, in Welcome to Bordertown.

This deserves to be on my blog more than once.

sarahalyse:

sarahalyse:

From “The Sages of Elsewhere” by Will Shetterly, in Welcome to Bordertown.

This deserves to be on my blog more than once.

"Hushabye, monster, if I get no sleep/I’ll drop you into a lake peaty and deep/And this is one promise I surely will keep/Kris-na-no-hany-ne-moreg"

vile-goblin-daughter:

SINGING THIS TO MY CHILDREN.

Good luck with that!

(Source: canceling-theapocalypse)

jenbekmanprojects:

Feral House #13 and Feral House #7 by James Griffioen

“As the city of Detroit disappears, nature is flourishing. I am interested in the duplicity of plant life in Detroit as both blindly innocent and somehow deeply sinister. The two feral houses selected here stood within three blocks of the border between Detroit and the old-money suburbs of Grosse Pointe: more than a municipal border, it is one of race, class and social order. In Grosse Pointe, meticulously groomed and maintained ivy walls of homes and institutions are a symbol of social elitism. In Detroit, ivy also flourishes as a symbol of the indomitable spirit of nature.”—Artist James Griffioen

With a nod to the Feral Houses in Tim Pratt’s WELCOME TO BORDERTOWN story, “Our Stars, our Selves!”

(via abandonedography)

"

historygirl2008: How did you come up with the setting for your book?

Terri Windling: I lived in New York City back in the 1980s, which is when the Bordertown series was created. New York was a different place then — dirtier, edgier, more dangerous, but also in some ways more exciting. The downtown music scene was exploding — punk and folk music were everywhere — and it wasn’t as expensive to live there then, so a lot of young artists, musicians, writers, etc. etc. were all living and doing crazy things in scruffy neighborhoods like the East Village.

I was a Fantasy Editor for a publishing company back then — but in those days, “fantasy” to most people meant “imaginary world” books, like Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings. A number of the younger writers in the field, however, wanted to create a branch of fantasy that was rooted in contemporary, urban North America, rather than medieval or pastoral Europe. I’d already been working with some of these folks (Charles de Lint, Emma Bull, etc.), who were writing novels that would become the foundations for the current Urban Fantasy field. At the time, these kinds of stories were considered so strange and different, it was actually hard to get them into print.

When I was asked by a publishing company to create a shared-world anthology for Young Adult readers, I wanted to create an Urban Fantasy setting that was something like a magical version of New York…but I didn’t want it to actually be New York. I want it to be any city and every city — a place that anyone from anywhere could go to or relate to. The idea of placing it on the border of Elfland came from the fact that I’d just re-read a fantasy classic called The King of Elfland’s Daughter by the Irish writer Lord Dunsany. I love stories that take place on the borderlands between two different worlds…and so I borrowed this concept, but adapted it to a modern, punky, urban setting.

I drew upon elements of the various cities I knew best — New York, Boston, London, Dublin, maybe even a little of Mexico City, where I’d been for a little while as a teen — and scrambled them up and turned them into Bordertown. There actually IS a Mad River in southern Ohio (where I went to college) and I always thought that was a great name, so I imported it to Bordertown. As for the water being red, that came from the river of blood in the Scottish folk ballad “Thomas the Rhymer,” which Thomas must cross to get into Elfland.

"

Excerpt of the Random Buzzers Q&A With Holly Black, Ellen Kushner, and Terri Windling”